Leaves on the line is no joke but we’re on the case in Sussex where jet-washing trains will travel the equivalent of 3 times around the Earth cleaning the railway: Autumn treatment 2

Tuesday 8 Oct 2019

Leaves on the line is no joke but we’re on the case in Sussex where jet-washing trains will travel the equivalent of 3 times around the Earth cleaning the railway

Region & Route:
South East
  • Millions of trees grow along the railway, dropping thousands of tonnes of leaves onto the tracks every autumn
  • When trains pass over these leaves, the heat and weight of the trains bake them into a thin, slippery layer on the rail which is the railway’s equivalent of black ice
  • Throughout the autumn and winter, our teams will work through the night to clear the tracks and keep them safe for trains

The effects of weather are a challenge for Britain's railway, and weather conditions can severely impact the day-to-day running of train services.

Autumn leaf fall causes operational problems for the signalling system and reduces trains' grip, which can change the ability of a train to start from a station, accelerate and climb hills or stop at stations or signals.

When trains pass over these leaves, the heat and weight of the trains bake them into a thin, slippery layer on the rail which is the railway’s equivalent of black ice. A build-up of leaves on the tracks can also cause delays by forming a barrier between the train wheels and the electrical parts of the track that let signallers know where the trains are.

To keep passengers safe, engineers and contractors maintain, repair and improve rail infrastructure around the clock in all weathers, to make it possible for trains to run. Train drivers also brake earlier when approaching stations and signals, to avoid overshooting their stop and they also accelerate more gently to avoid wheel spin.

To help them tackle the challenges come rain or shine and keep the railway resilient, our seasonal track treatment machines and vehicles are ready and waiting. They will carry and deliver nearly 100,000 litres of water per circuit and water-jet the track with a pressure of 1500mb which is enough to cut through metal.

Some trains will even have equipment that applies ultra-fine dried sand onto the rail in front of the wheels which improves grip when braking or accelerating.

Rob Davis, Delivery Director, Network Rail said: “Even with the best preparation, leaves fall onto the line which can cause the same conditions as black ice on the roads. With millions of trees growing alongside the railway, it’s something the rail industry takes seriously.

“That’s why our ‘leaf-busting’ trains and front-line teams are out there 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to make sure we can get passengers from A to B safely and reliably.”

Before the autumn, recently-qualified train drivers receive an autumn driving brief which frequently includes additional time on simulators to help them improve the skills they’ll need to deal with slippery rails.

Mike Paterson, Network Operations Director at Govia Thameslink Railway which runs Thameslink and Southern, said: “Autumn can be a particularly difficult time but working with Network Rail we will do our very best to keep our services running on time.”

Before the leaves even hit the rails, we work all year to minimise the impact. Our ongoing vegetation management programme means fewer leaves fall on the tracks along with improving safety by helping to prevent trees falling on the line during storms.

We also receive ‘adhesion forecasts’ from a specialist weather forecaster which tells us where leaves are most likely to stick to the rails. This helps us to make sure teams are ready to respond quickly.

Contact information

Passengers / community members
Network Rail national helpline
03457 11 41 41

Latest travel advice
Please visit National Rail Enquiries

Journalists
Leonard Bennett
Leonard.Bennett@networkrail.co.uk

About Network Rail

We own, operate and develop Britain's railway infrastructure; that's 20,000 miles of track, 30,000 bridges, tunnels and viaducts and the thousands of signals, level crossings and stations. We run 20 of the UK's largest stations while all the others, over 2,500, are run by the country's train operating companies.

Every day, there are more than 4.8 million journeys made in the UK and over 600 freight trains run on the network. People depend on Britain's railway for their daily commute, to visit friends and loved ones and to get them home safe every day. Our role is to deliver a safe and reliable railway, so we carefully manage and deliver thousands of projects every year that form part of the multi-billion pound Railway Upgrade Plan, to grow and expand the nation's railway network to respond to the tremendous growth and demand the railway has experienced - a doubling of passenger journeys over the past 20 years.

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